Protozoa
EPA 1989
list
Primary
Pathogens
Heart
disease
Cerebrovascular
disease
Respiratory
disease
Pneumonia
Eye
infections
Hearing
loss
Mental
retardation
Blood
Balantidium
X
    X
X
       
Cryptococcosis
    X
           
Cryptosporidium
X  
    X
         
Entamoeba
X
X
X
X
        X
Giardia lambia
X
               
Naegleria fowleri
    X
           
Toxoplasma
gondii
X
  X
  X
X
X
X
 
                   
Protozoa

By Jim Bynum, VP                                                                                                                                                                                         1/1/2009
Help for Sewage Victims

EPA claims sludge is safe because it does not test for protozoa listed as: 1) Infectious characteristics (RCRA); 2)
disease causing agents (CWA - CERCLA); and 3)  
Etiologic Agents (CDC) The Public Health Security and Bioterrorism
Preparedness and Response Act of 2002,  
(UDSDA 9CFR 121 & 7 CFR 331) and hazardous waste rules Part 261.

A team led by microbiologist Sharon Berk, of Tennessee Technological University in Cookeville, fed lab-grown bacterial
pathogens to protozoa found on grocery store produce. Her team did not find the pathogenic
bacteria on the supermarket veggies. When Berk's team then examined the protozoa, they discovered the bacteria
alive and well in their stomachs.

Apparently the pathogens upset the protozoa's digestion, though. A day after mixing E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella
with protozoa, the team noticed that many of the bacteria had been "vomited" up into round clumps.

When the researchers added these clumps to pulverized spinach, the E. coli
cells tripled in number after just a few hours.


Table 5 Parasite and diseases  which could lead to death