USDA NEWS RELEASE

Release No. 0245.06
Contact:
Angela Harless (202)720-4623



USDA OFFERS GUIDE TO HELP AGRICULTURAL
PRODUCERS PROTECT THE U.S. FOOD SUPPLY

WASHINGTON, July 12, 2006 - The U.S. Department of
Agriculture today released a guide entitled
"Pre-Harvest Security Guidelines and Checklist 2006"
to help agricultural producers enhance security at the
farm level. These practical measures help to protect
against natural disasters, as well as
the unintentional or
intentional introduction of plant or animal diseases
.

"We work on many fronts to ensure that our nation
continues to provide the safest food supply in the
world," said Agriculture Deputy Secretary Chuck
Conner. "While there is no one-size-fits-all approach to
protecting agriculture, recommendations in this guide
can be beneficial to a variety of types and sizes of
agricultural operations."

Food and agriculture biosecurity is an important
component of USDA's mission. Improving awareness
through enhanced outreach and communications is a
key element of USDA's homeland security efforts. The
voluntary guidelines and checklists were developed
based upon recommendations made by producers
throughout the United States. Guidelines have been
developed for general agriculture; dairy; crops; cattle
and poultry security.

This guide is the latest in a series of materials
produced by USDA to bolster food and agriculture
security. USDA continues to work closely with its
federal, state and local government partners as well as
industry stakeholders to develop sector-wide
guidelines. For instance, guidance has been issued by
USDA for food processors and distributors, and for
agricultural transporters in coordination with the
trucking industry.

Agriculture and food account for 13 percent of the U.S.
gross domestic product, 18 percent of its employment
and $140 billion in revenue. USDA continues to work
with its federal, state, local partners as well as industry
in protecting the nation's agriculture and food
production, from threats such as natural disasters and
either the naturally occurring, intentional or
unintentional introduction of diseases and pathogens
as they do not respect geographic borders. The
interconnected global food system contributes to our
nation's economic strength by improving production
and marketing efficiency and providing timely
responses to consumer needs.

USDA's local Farm Service Agency Service Centers are
distributing the "Pre-Harvest Security Guidelines and
Checklist 2006" to agricultural producers throughout
the country. For more information about USDA's
homeland security efforts, go to
www.usda.gov/homelandsecurity.
USDA FACTS

"the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug
Administration, and EPA issued a joint policy statement in
1981 that endorsed the use of  [sludge] biosolids on land for
producing fruits and vegetables. Then, in 1984, EPA issued
a policy statement in the Federal Register that encouraged
and endorsed the recycling of [sludge] biosolids. And again
in 1991, EPA was a co-endorser of an Interagency Policy
placed in the Federal Register regarding the benefits of
using biosolids."

PATHOGENS IN SLUDGE - BIOSOLIDS - RECLAIMED WATER
Why Would EPA Imply These Pathogens Are Not Disease Causing
Organisms?    Part 503 list -1989
Why did EPA refuse to make this list public in the final 1993 Part 503?

THERE IS NO FEDERAL STANDARD FOR PATHOGENS.
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS    LABORATORY SAFETY
http://deadlydeceit.com/MSDS-Sheets.html

503.9(t) Pollutant is an organic substance, an inorganic substance, a
combination of organic and  inorganic substances, or
a pathogenic
organism
that, after discharge and upon exposure, ingestion,  
inhalation, or assimilation into an organism either directly from the
environment or indirectly by ingestion  through the food chain, could, on
the basis of information available to the Administrator of EPA, cause  
death, disease, behavioral abnormalities, cancer, genetic mutations,
physiological malfunctions  (including malfunction in reproduction), or
physical deformations in either organisms (humans) or  offspring
(children) of the organisms

"EPA concluded that adequate protection of public health
and the environment did not require the adoption of
standards designed to protect human health or the
environment under exposure conditions that are unlikely and
where effects were not significant or widespread." (FR. 58, p.
9252)

In May 1997, the
six federal agencies responsible for food
safety which includes the FDA, CDC, USDA and EPA
reported to the President in "FOOD SAFETY FROM FARM
TO TABLE, A NATIONAL FOOD-SAFETY INITIATIVE" that
there were only between 6.5 and 33 million food related
illnesses in the United States each year. It would appear that
the CDC forgot to use
its current data in the report, since
the numbers quoted by these government enforcement
agencies, who are all promoting the use of sludge as a
fertilizer, were from 1994 figures.

In a
letter dated November 10, 1997, to USDA's Deputy
Secretary, Richard Rominger.  EPA's Assistant Administrator,
Robert Perciasepe's letter to Rominger emphasized the past
support of USDA in developing Part 503 and the need for
USDA to continue supporting the regulation with technical
information.  He wrote, "The authoritative support by your
Department is most helpful to our program. It is [was] vital to
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) ability to
promulgate scientifically valid regulations for biosolids
(sludge) use and to provide technically correct information."

FOOD POISONING PARALLELS USE OF
SLUDGE/BIOSOLIDS

MRSA - Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus is
spread in same time frame

PANDEMICS?  COINCIDENCE?

GLOSSARY OF INFECTIONS AND DISEASES
                   USDA LITTLE JOKE ON THE FARMERS

Article -- USDA Ordered to compensate Georgia farmer for contaminated cropland. Officials admit knowing
that sludge chemical contaminated milk had been sold to public since 1999. Thallium (in the milk) is a toxic
heavy metal that can cause gastrointestinal irritation and nerve damage,

Forty-five page Court Order -- McElmurray vs USDA

Attorney Hallman's letter to University of Georgia President on lawsuit concerning fraudulent study by
University scientists.

Notwithstanding the provisions of §72.2, no person may knowingly transport or cause to be transported in interstate traffic, directly
or indirectly, any material [other than biological products] known to contain, or reasonably believed by such person to contain, one or
more of the following etiologic agents unless such material is packaged, labeled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements
specified in paragraphs [a]-[f] of this section:

Many of the etiologic agents (pathogens) are the same as those found in sludge biosolids fecal coliform and coliform tests.
GA-courtOrder.pdf
UGlawsuit.pdf